Exactly Who’s the Boss Here?

This post appears on the NAVAC Blog. By Sheila Edens-Brown Thursday, Juy 29th, 2010 After 20 years in the corporate world, I experienced burn-out to the point where just thinking of going to work would make me literally sick. It was at this point that I knew that it was time to put my dream of being a business owner in place. After going through the motions and getting everything in place, it was time to hang out the shingles. Just the thought of being a business owner was exuberating. I had my first client within two weeks, even though she is taking a break from her business because of the death of her husband, she is still my client and we have had a wonderful relationship. All have not been like her. There were control issues; money problems and just not letting me do my job because they felt they knew better than I how to accomplish the task. After becoming a part of the NAVAC group I discovered that I was still working under the employee mindset and that my clients were calling the shots. Kim and the group showed me how I needed to be in control, that this was my business and that I was the one to determine how my business was to be run; I was the boss and not the employee. It was at this point that I revised my policies and payment procedures. A clear line was set as to my office hours, how task would be completed that would benefit the client and myself and that I was the one...

Tips for Business Bloggers: How to Connect with Readers and Develop Your Blog

A blog is your chance to connect with a specific audience, so building up a relationship of trust with them is critical.  Therefore, do not ever lie or exaggerate your income, popularity, stats, readers, subscriptions, etc on your blog.   That being said, there is such a thing as being too honest about your lack of experience as a blog writer, or the fact that your site is new and therefore does not yet have a big following.  This can happen by either having a lack of professionalism in the way your blog website is presented, or by your own posts telling your readers that no one ever visits.  Keep any frustrations about low visitor counts to yourself, and treat every blog post like a sales presentation.  (This doesn't mean use sales-speak.  That puts readers off immediately.  This means always put your best face forward.)  Never, ever comment on low blog reader turnout on the blog itself.  No one wants to hang out someplace that tells them up front that it is unpopular!  Instead, find out why no one is visiting, and fix it! Take a look at other websites and blogs in your niche, and note particularly ones you find professional.  Compare this to your site, focusing on the differences in graphics, presentation, layout, and how they handle advertising.  Also notice if they have a professional (pay) theme for their blog, if they've created their own in-house, or if they're using a free theme.  There are many wonderful, professional-looking free themes out there, but you will need to dig around and choose carefully. When you find a site you...